There are two baths located in the southern part of Fin Garden, which was originally designed and quartered off for the Safavid Shah Abbas I (1571-1629).

The smaller one is a Safavid (1501-1736) building and the larger one was built by the Qajars (1785-1925). The small bath, which was built along with the original structures of the Garden, was used by servants and the larger bath, which was built by Fath-Ali Shah Qajar (1772-1834), was used by nobles.

Both baths have a changing room (sarbineh), and a hot chamber (garm khaneh), hot water pool (khazineh) and fountain (howz).

The walls of the larger bath have been insulated with sand and quicklime and have detailed stucco reliefs along with turquoise and Persian blue tilework. The bath has several interconnected chambers and a labyrinth of passageways.

The importance of Fin Bath is because it is where nationalist hero Amir Kabir (1807- 1852) was assassinated.

Ami Kabir’s father worked as a cook for Mirza Abul-Qasim Farahani (1779-1835), a Qajar Prime Minister. Farahani, who recognized Amir Kabir’s intelligence, allowed him to receive an education along with his own children. This later paved the way for Amir Kabir to join government service. Despite his common origins, he quickly rose to power. 

Amir Kabir, who served as a prime minister under Nasser-al Din Shah (1831-1896) from 1848 to 1851, is remembered as a modernizer who instituted significant change in many areas, most notably in the fields of education and administration.  

One of the many great acts of Amir Kabir was establishing Dar ul-Funun school in Tehran, which is considered the first modern institution of higher education in the country. Many parts of the institute were later merged into the newly established Tehran University. The school’s graduates were among the most influential figures in modern Iranian history and included names such as royal painter Mohammad Khan Ghaffari (Kamal-ol-Molk), journalist and political activist Jahangir-Khan Sur-e-Esrafil (1874-1908), novelist Sadeq Hedayat (1903-1951), and Pahlavi Prime Minister Ali Amini (1905-1992).

Amir Kabir’s national popularity and financial reforms, which largely affected courtiers and provoked their hatred and enmity, resulted in the formation of a coalition spearheaded by the Queen Mother, who held great influence over a  young Nasser-al Din Shah. Amir Kabir was subsequently demoted to Army Chief and through the efforts of the Queen Mother exiled to Kashan where he was kept in isolation in Fin Garden. Only six weeks after his exile, Amir Kabir was assassinated upon an order by Nasser-al Din Shah in Fin Bath in 1852.

Today, this bathhouse attracts numerous visitors, who come to see its beautiful design and the place where the first reformer in Iranian History drew his last breath.

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